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Bertha Jaques: Botanical Prints and Photographs

January 19 - May 12, 2013

Bertha Jaques, Bittersweet, 1920, hand colored etching, gift of the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, 89.3.98.
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Accomplished printmaker and photographer Bertha Jaques is perhaps best known for her prints of wildflowers and ferns. Her interest in this subject matter grew out of her desire to present something that was not only beautiful to behold, but also promoted wildflower preservation. Jaques’ interest in environmental issues was only one way in which she was a pioneering woman artist. Not only did Jaques succeed in a field dominated by male artists, she helped popularize etching in America. Jaques’ full impact on printmaking and photography at the dawn of the twentieth century is still under-recognized and ripe for reappraisal.

Born Bertha Clausen in Covington, Ohio in 1863, Jaques lived in Cedar Rapids from 1885 to 1889. She did not come to printmaking until she was in her 30s when, in 1893, she attended the Chicago Columbian Exposition where she saw prints by such notable artists as James Abbott McNeil Whistler, James Tissot, and Anders Zorn. She became immediately interested in the etching technique and her surgeon husband (an 1883 graduate of Cornell College whom she met in Mt. Vernon) fashioned tools out of surgical instruments so she could etch copper printing plates. With the purchase of a printing press, Jaques made her first etching in Chicago in 1894. Her interest in printmaking never waned and her home and studio were the setting of many artistic events. Jaques was one of the founders of the Chicago Society of Etchers in 1910, serving as its secretary/treasurer for 27 years. During her 46-year career, she created 461 prints and more than 1,000 cyanotype photographs. Although largely self-taught, Jaques was an influential teacher and mentor, authoring a book, Concerning Etchings, in 1912. Also an accomplished poet, Jaques self-published a number of volumes of her poetry.

As a graphic artist, Jaques’ body of work can be divided between black-and-white prints of landscapes—both Midwestern and from her foreign travels—and her botanical prints, many of which were hand colored. The Cedar Rapids Museum of Art is fortunate to possess not only nearly every print Jaques created, but also several states of certain prints, which allows viewers to see the evolution of Jaques’ thought process within a single print. In addition, the collection contains many cyanotypes of botanical subjects as well as Jaques’ archive, filled with personal photographs, correspondence, and essays and lectures.

In 2013, on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of her birth, the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art will present three successive exhibitions: one of her botanical prints and cyanotypes, one of her images of foreign locales, and one of her domestic scenes, including her beloved Chicago. In this way, repeat visitors will be able to gain a better sense of the artist’s breadth and depth of production. Only then can a proper re-appraisal of her place in the history of printmaking be properly considered.

This exhibition has been made possible in part by the Altorfer, Inc. Donor-Advised Fund and the Momentum Fund, both funds of The Greater Cedar Rapids Community Foundation.





Commentary

Maico
on 07/03/13
Good morning Deb! I will admit that I don't do cgnahe well either, but you sure have managed to find the good in this. Closer to work and family is a BIG bonus, as is a smaller place to clean! ; ) Getting back some of your original things is also a treat. Truthfully the only time I miss our bigger place much is when we are ALL together and I feel like we are stepping over one another. But that doesn't happen very often anymore anyway. And the rest of the time this place is cozy and perfect for the two of us. At the end of the day as long as we have each other and our health, we have everything we need. Looking forward to hearing about your new place as you settle in and make it home. HUGS! http://rozlfjix.com [url=http://yocepsmvfw.com]yocepsmvfw[/url] [link=http://ufgtomft.com]ufgtomft[/link]
Deliverance
on 06/30/13
Dag nbbait good stuff you whippersnappers!
Luisa
on 06/30/13
. With all of the true and false stereotypes and by the iainitl tone of this article I got the feeling the author was ina defensive tone from the get-go, which is a sign to salespeople that you may not be worth the commission. I hate to tell the general public this, but there are just some customers who are not worth having. Let me clarify: for most people, buying a car is one of the biggest purchases of their life and one of the few times they actually come into contact with business meaning dealing with an industry that deals in a commodity and has the ability to negotiate. Car people negotiate on a daily basis, and are not emotionally attached to it. Most business people are not emotionally attached to their business deals either, but the general public surely is. So when a car person meets a customer who has the persona of they are out to get me , it's a warning that they might (not always but might) be a future nightmare to deal with. 2.The author/customer had no idea what the car was worth. Did he ask what the NADA retail value for the car was? What about trade in value? What about wholesale value? He never said and it could be assumed that he didn't which means that the dealer COULD have been selling the car to him for $5000 below trade in, which would be impossible, but we'll (no will he/she) ever know. 3.Red flags. He has never bought a car before, and we have no idea of the level of car he was looking at. It was difficult at best getting first time car buyers financed when things wee good and I can only imagine now they are next to impossible without a sizable down payment. Sizable? I mean 50%. Yep, without a strong co-signer, that's how much it takes. So if was looking at a 20k car, and with no previous car credit, and with the air of defensiveness, why should this salesman chase him when he left when the chances are, this customer probably couldn't have bought anyway. I know, I know. He could have pulled out 100K He could have had his mom cosign He coulda blah, blah, blah. These things happen, but I hate to tell you this and shatter your illusions, but not that often. Except for the cosigner, but if really wanted to be taken seriously, he would have brought them along Which he did not know that he should have because this really IS his first rodeo. Sorry.3. ETCH is bullshit. Everyone knows it. It does work IF your vehicle is stolen AND get's chopped up, AND ever found again. This is perfect storm of car crime and car crime catching that again, rarely happens. But WHEN it does, the guarantees/etc will pay. Still bullshit. So why put it in? Because the dealer wants you to object to that and NOT the price of the car. They will gladly take it out if you make it a deal killer. It's a great negotiation tactic. 4. Documentation fee. I went from a finance manager at one company to a sales manager at another. Then I became the General Sales Manager. Their is a real pecking order in car dealerships and the GSM answers to the General Manager and the owner, who often times are one in the same. The first thing I did was institute a documentation fee of $99. Why? I wanted to set the tone, we would raise it later. Why do it in the first place? What is it for? Simple, it's guaranteed profit for the dealership, and when asked we trained our salespeople to actually tell the customer that. The customers actually found it refreshing that a small business would openly admit to profit. We would allow them to negotiate the fee off of the price of the car if they objected, meaning that we would NOT lose someone's business over the doc fee. We also added it because since 95 percent of all car sales are financed, the banks have the ultimate control over how much a car gets sold for. Didn't know that did you? Let me explain: The banks will only finance a certain percentage above the trade or retail value of the car. I cant sell a car worth 20k for 35k after all of the taxes and tags are included, because the bank won't finance it, even if the customer wanted it. Why, because cars move around and are easily hid and go down in value fast which makes them terrible collateral. But they WILL allow us to roll in the doc fee over an above the agreed to amount, up to generally $395. Furthermore we didn't have to pay commission on that profit. Sorry. Lastly, most dealers do charge a doc fee, and most customers don't care. Enough said.5. The used car department typically is 90% of the service department's profit. Yep, that high. They do overcharge the used car department because then the parts/labor get added to the cost of the car so their is instant profit for the dealer and less commission to pay on the sale of the car. The dealer DOES pay commission to the service dept manager at a much, much lower percentage than a car salesman, ensuring that the if the car is even CLOSE to needing work, it WILL get it before it goes on the lot. The customer also wins because the car has been gone over by a tech who ge
Auth
on 03/14/13
yes the kids love finding their hand and shoinwg their friends! Sounds like a great idea to put the kids hands on the hallway at the YMCA! the best advice i can give is to have lots of help! as i am sure you know kids and paint can be a mess! We put their hands right in the bucket after they finished so we did not get paint everywhere! great to hear from you!


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